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Mendelssohn and the Organ$

Wm. A. Little

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195394382

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195394382.001.0001

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(p.405) Appendix C: Major Editions And Comparative Tempo Charts For Mendelssohn's Organ Works

(p.405) Appendix C: Major Editions And Comparative Tempo Charts For Mendelssohn's Organ Works

Source:
Mendelssohn and the Organ
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Germany: 1871–2005

From the time that they were first published, there has never been a moment when either Op. 37 or Op. 65 has been out of print. Breitkopf und Härtel kept their original editions of Op. 37 and Op. 65 in print and available without competition until 1877. In that year C. F. Peters brought out an edition of Opp. 37 and 65, edited by F. A. Roitzsch, who had earlier collaborated with Griepenkerl on the Peters Edition of Bach's organ works. At about the same time the organ works were also published as part of the multi-volumed complete works, edited by Julius Rietz, and published by Breitkopf und Härtel (1874–1877).1 Only a year later (1878), the indefatigable Dr. W. Volckmar edited Opp. 37 and 65, complete with fingerings and pedalings, for the Collection Litolff in Braunschweig. Both the Peters and the Breitkopf und Härtel editions remained otherwise without serious challenge for nearly a century, although at some point (ca. 1900?) the Peters edition was revised; new plates were cut and supplied with fingerings and pedalings by an unnamed editor.2

In Germany Mendelssohn's popularity declined through the early years of the twentieth century, and then after the advent of National Socialism in the 1930s, his music ceased entirely to be heard or played, certainly in any public venue. In the years following World War II, however, Mendelssohn and his works enjoyed a gradual renaissance, and in 1976 Hubert Meister edited the Organ Sonatas in an “Urtext” edition for G. Henle Verlag, for which Wolfgang Stockmeier provided fingerings and pedalings. Four years later Breitkopf und Härtel brought out a reprint of its original 1845 edition of the Organ Sonatas, edited by Gerd Zacher,3 which reflected a growing trend away from heavily annotated editions.

(p.406) At the same time that these new editions were appearing in the Bundesrepublik (West Germany), Mendelssohn and his works were also being rehabilitated and celebrated with equal, if not greater, enthusiasm in the German Democratic Republic. In 1959 the International-Felix-Mendelssohn-Gesellschaft was founded in Basel, and shortly thereafter a new edition of Mendelssohn's complete works was announced, which was to be a cooperative effort between the Mendelssohn-Gesellschaft, the Staatsbiliothek in Berlin (East), and the VEB Deutscher Verlag für Musik in Leipzig. It was perhaps not the most propitious of times to undertake such an immense project, but over the next fifteen years or so, numerous volumes were actually published. In 1972 I was retained to edit Mendelssohn's organ works for the Leipziger Ausgabe, and two years later a preprint (Vorabdruck) containing nine works appeared in a practical edition (“Volksausgabe”).4 At about the same time, I submitted final copy for Opp. 37 and 65, as well as the other then known and available organ works, but it soon became apparent that the whole project had become financially unsustainable, and by the late 1970s it expired quietly and virtually without notice.

Over the course of the 1980s and 1990s the situation vis-à-vis Mendelssohn brightened significantly. Encouraged not only by the widespread renewal of interest in Mendelssohn's works generally but also by the reunification of the two German states in 1990 and the recovery and accessibility in Krakow of works long believed lost, the plans for a critical edition of Mendelssohn's complete works were implemented with a revival of the Leipziger Ausgabe under the general editorship of Christian Martin Schmidt. Schmidt, who has edited works by such diverse composers as Johannes Brahms, Arnold Schönberg, and Hanns Eisler, undertook the edition of the organ works, which appeared as series IV, Klavier- und Orgelwerke, volumes 6–8 (2004–2005).

England

When Coventry and Hollier in London ceased to exist in 1848, many of the company's plates were bought by J. Alfred Novello. The original edition of Op. 65 was kept in print, although new plates eventually had to be cut. It was superseded, however, in 1871, when Novello-Ewer published William T. Best's edition of Opp. 37 and 65. Best retained all the original tempo and dynamic markings but rearranged the distribution of manual parts in places where it became “difficult to trace the division of the parts or define the exact employment intended for the left hand.”5 Best's edition enjoyed lasting popularity because of its large (p.407) print and clear format, but in 1914 it encountered momentary competition when A. Eaglefield-Hull edited Opp. 37 and 65 for Augener. Eaglefield-Hull retained Best's various manual redistributions (without attribution) but otherwise added nothing new, other than publishing the works in vertical (portrait) rather than in the traditional horizontal (landscape) format. Eaglefield-Hull's edition failed to gain broad traction in England, and Best's edition remained preeminent in Britain until well into the twentieth century. In 1934 Ivor Atkins brought out his own idiosyncratic edition for Novello, in which he introduced a number of schematic and interpretive innovations. Atkins's edition was extravagantly praised in the Musical Times and for several decades enjoyed a measure of popularity in England.6 By mid-century, however, it had been replaced by any one of several continental editions.

In the mid-1980s the musical world welcomed the news that the bulk of Mendelssohn's works, long believed to have been lost in World War II, had in fact been safely stored for more than forty years in Krakow, Poland, and were again made available to scholars. The recovery of the manuscript volumes containing Mendelssohn's early thoughts and drafts for his Organ Sonatas, as well as other previously unexamined materials, provided fresh impetus for a historical-critical edition of the complete organ works, which Novello published in five volumes (1987–1990).

France and the United States

In France the Peters edition remained the most popular throughout the nineteenth century and even into the 1920s. That situation began to change, however, in 1918, when A. Durand brought out Charles Marie Widor's edition of Opp. 37 and 65, which the firm hoped would replace the Peters edition. The Peters edition, however, had long been entrenched in France, and Durand/Widor was slow to make headway against it. Finally, in 1948, Bornemann in Paris published the exhaustively annotated edition by Marcel Dupré, and it gradually replaced both Peters and Durand.

In the United States the Peters edition was regarded as standard until the New York organist Samuel P. Warren, a pupil of Haupt in Berlin, brought out a “students' edition” of Opp. 37 and 65 with G. Schirmer in New York (1896). Warren's edition had been in print for hardly more than a decade, however, before G. Schirmer engaged Edwin H. Lemare to produce a new edition (1910). Despite Lemare's fame, his edition did not entirely succeed in displacing Warren's edition, which continued to enjoy widespread popularity until roughly mid-century, when more recent European editions began to appear.

(p.408) Notable Editions of Opp. 37 and 65:1871–2005

  1. Title Pages

    1. Six Sonatas / and / Three Preludes and Fugues / Composed for the / Organ / by Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy/ Edited by W. T. Best / Ent. Sta. Hall. [1871] Price 5/-/ London & New York / Novello, Ewer, and Co.

    Best's edition contains Mendelssohn's Preface from the 1845 Coventry and Hollier edition. Best also includes a brief explanation—with examples—of various changes he has made in his edition to facilitate performance. Opus 65: no plate no.; Opus 37: plate no. 4398.

  2. 2. Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy's / Werke, / Kritisch durchgesehen Ausgabe / von Julius Rietz / mit Genehmigung der Originalverleger / sigl. / Serie 12, / für Orgel. / No. 83. 3 Präludien und Fugen Op. 37. No. 84. 6 Sonaten. Op. 65/ sigl. / Leipzig, Verlag von Breitkopf & Härtel. [1874–1877].

    Repr. Gregg International Publishers, Ltd. / Westmead, Farmborough, Hants, England, 1967, 1969 (2).

  3. 3. Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy's / Sämtliche Werke. / Compositionen / für die Orgel / revidirt von / F. A. Roitzsch. / sigl. / LEIPZIG / C. F. Peters [1877] plate no. 6005.

    Roitzsch omitted Mendelssohn's Preface, provided no commentary, and left the composer's score unannotated.

  4. 4. Collection Litolff / Sämmtliche / Compositionen / für/ Orgel/ von/ Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy / Kritisch revidirt und mit / Vortragsbezeichnungen und Pedalapplicatur versehen / von / Dr. W. Volckmar / Eigenthum des Verlegers / Braunschweig. / Henry Litolff's Verlag. / Boston & New York: Arthur P. Schmidt. / Paris: Enoch & Cie. London: Enoch & Sons. / St. Petersburg; J. Jurgenson. Milano: Carisch & Janichen. Moscou: P. Jurgenson. [1878] Lacks Mendelssohn's Preface. Plate no. 933.

    Volckmar provides no fingerings but does indicate pedalings throughout. He provides no metronome markings for Op. 37 but supplies Mendelssohn's metronome markings consistently for Op. 65.

  5. 5. Schirmer's Library of Musical/ Classics / [sigl.] / Vol. 227 / Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy / Compositions for the / Organ/-/ Three Preludes and Fugues, Op. 37/ Six Sonatas, Op. 65 / [sigl.] / Students' Edition / Edited and Fingered / by Samuel P. Warren. New York: G. Schirmer / Copyright, 1896. by G. Schirmer.

    (p.409)

    At the time this edition appeared, Warren was the organ editor for G. Schirmer.7 Warren included Mendelssohn's Preface, to which he added, “With reference to the above prefatory remarks, the editor desires to have it understood that such extra indications in registration as he has given are to be regarded simply as suggestions. They are not intended in the slightest degree to forestall the general directions of the composer, but rather to aid the student in more readily carrying these out.” Warren provides metronome markings for Op. 37 but follows Mendelssohn's metronome indications for Op. 65. Plate no. 12572.

  6. 6. Schirmer's Library of Musical / Classics / [sigl.] / Vol. 976 / Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy / Compositions for the / Organ / Three Preludes and Fugues, Op. 37 / Six Sonatas, Op. 65 / Edited and Revised / by / Edwin H. Lemare / New York: G. Schirmer / Boston: Boston Music Co. / Copyright: 1910, by G. Schirmer, Inc. / Printed in the U. S. A. [Plate no. 21403]

    Curiously, Lemare has provided extensive pedalings throughout, but the edition is only very sparsely fingered. Lemare omitted Mendelssohn's Preface but furnished his own:

    At the request of many, this new Edition of Mendelssohn's Organ Works is offered in the hope that it may be a guide in phrasing, expression, ease of pedaling and effective registration. In all the Sonatas (and, whenever possible, in the Fugues) the question of turning over the leaves has also been considered. The stop-indications given are in accordance with the organ of the present day; but, as the tone-quality of the same stop varies greatly with the different builders, personal discretion must always be used by the player. The two hands are divided as much as possible into the two staves—for clearness in reading.

    Some of the passages, in the more rapid movements, which are marked staccato, are thus intended only when taken at the speed indicted. At a slower tempo such a staccato would not be necessary, so long as clearness of touch and phrasing are maintained.

    Where there is a small “B” or “F” under a pedal mark, it indicates that the foot is to be in a backward or a forward position on the pedal-board.

    The Editor trusts that this Edition may be of value to the earnest student in his endeavour to get a clearer and more comprehensive idea of these great organ works.

    Edwin H. Lemare

    New York, June 1st, 1910

  7. (p.410)
  8. 7. Augener's Edition / Mendelssohn / Complete / Organ Works / Edited by / Dr. A. Eaglefield-Hull / 9359 Complete / 9541 Preludes & Fugues. Op. 37 / 9542 Sonatas. Op. 65 / Augener Ltd. / 18 Great Marlborough Street / 63 Conduit Street (Regent Street Corner) & 57 High Street Marylebone / London, W. 1. [Copyright 1914 by Augener Ltd.]

  9. 8. Edition Classique A. Durand & Fils/ [Sigl.] / No. 9513 / Mendelssohn / OEUVRES D'orgue / Révision par C. M. Widor / Prix net: 4 Fr./ [sigl.] / Paris. A. Durand & Fils, Editeurs / Durand & Cie / 4, Place de la Madeleine / Déposé selon les traités internationaux. Propriété pour tous pays. / Tous droits d'exécution de traduction de reproduction et d'arrangements réservés. [Copyright by Durand & Cie., 1918]

    Widor follows Mendelssohn's metronome markings meticulously; he supplies neither fingerings nor pedalings. He also provides Mendelssohn's Preface in German, English, and French, as well as a lengthy introduction in French and English on Mendelssohn and the organs of his time. He concludes with the following:

    I shall not offer any advice on the subject of the registration of the pieces in this collection, seeing that the author himself has undertaken it. One observation, nevertheless; our modern French instruments are much richer in reed stops and 16 ft. stops than those of that time, so beware! The “forte” of Mendelssohn like that of Bach was produced almost exclusively by the combination of foundation stops and mixtures: now the use of our “fat” trumpets produces too heavy an effect.

    Rule without exception: everything should be heard clearly. Listen to the orchestra where nothing is lost to the listener and you will know how to play his organ music.

  10. 9. Mendelssohn / Six Sonatas / for Organ / Op. 65 / edited by Ivor Atkins / London: Novello & Company, Limited / New York: The H. W. Gray Co. Sole Agents for the U.S.A. / Made in England [Copyright 1934]

    Plate no. 16062.

    Atkins provides Mendelssohn's Preface in English. The edition contains fingerings and pedalings.

    Three / Preludes and Fugues / for Organ / by / Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy / Op. 37 / Edited by / Ivor Atkins / Price Three Shillings / London: Novello & Company, Limited / New York: The H. W. Gray Co., sold Agents for the U.S.

    A. / Made in England [Copyright 1934]

    Plate no. 16102.

    Atkins provides fingerings and pedalings but no introduction or commentary.

  11. (p.411)
  12. 10. Six Sonatas / Three Preludes / and Fugues / for the Organ / by / Felix Mendelssohn / Edited and Revised / by / Edwin Arthur Kraft / Copyright 1947 by Theodore Presser Co. / sigl. / Theodor Presser Co. / 1713 Chestnut Street / Philadelphia / sigl. / Design Copyrighted / Printed in U.S.A. [Plate no. P.C. 351–131]

    A highly ornate cartouche, within which the title is set. Kraft omitted Mendelssohn's Preface but provided nothing in its place. The edition is heavily annotated.

  13. 11. Oeuvres complètes pour Orgue / de / Felix Mendelssohn / revues, anotées et doigtées / par / Marcel Dupré / Trois Préludes et Fugues / Six Sonates / Prix Net: / Paris – S. Bornemann, Editeur / 15, rue de Tournon / Déposé selon les traités internationaux—Propriété pour tous pays / Tous droits d'exécution, de traduction, de reproduction et d'arrangements réservé / Copyright 1948 by S. Bornemann

    Plate no. 5346.

    Dupré provides Mendelssohn's Preface in German, French, and English, as well as an extensive introduction or guide to performing the works. Heavily annotated.

  14. 12. Mendelssohn Bartholdy / Orgelsonaten / Opus 65 / nach Eigenschriften, Abschriften und den / Beiden Erstausgaben Herausgegeben / von / Hubert Meister / Finger- und Pedalsatz von / Wolfgang Stockmeier / G. Henle Verlag München [1976]

    Announced as “URTEXT” on cover. No Plate no.

    Meister provides Mendelssohn's Preface, plus a paragraph on his sources, as well as brief comments on five movements in the Sonatas that relate primarily to alternative readings.

  15. 13. Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy / Sechs Sonaten / für Orgel / Op. 65 / [sigl.] Breitkopf & Härtel ·Wiesbaden / Edition Breitkopf no. 8088 / Printed in Germany

    Edited by Gerd Zacher. A reprint of the original Breitkopf und Härtel edition (1845), with Mendelssohn's Preface in both German and English. Zacher also comments briefly on the edition. The plate numbers, 7281–86, are the same as those of 1845.

  16. 14. Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy / Complete Organ Works / Edited in five volumes by Wm. A. Little / FMB/ [I–V] / [Contents] / Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy [signature facsimile] Novello Publishing Limited / 8/9 Frith Street, London W1V 5TZ. [1987–1990]

    Historical-critical edition, including Mendelssohn's Preface, textual commentary, and variant readings.

  17. (p.412)
  18. 15. Mendelssohn Bartholdy / Orgelstücke / nach Augographen, Abschriften / und Erstausgaben herausgegeben sowie mit / Finger- und Pedalsatz Versehen / von/ Wolfgang Stockmeier / G. Henle Verlag München [1988]

    Announced as “URTEXT” on the cover. A companion volume to Meister's edition of Op. 65, also published by Henle in 1980. Contains Op. 37, plus other organ works previously published elsewhere.

  19. 16. Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy / Neue Ausgabe sämlticher / Orgelwerke I [II] / New Edition of the Complete / Organ Works I [II] / Herausgegeben von Edited by Christoph Albrecht / sigl. / Bärenreiter Kassel · Basel · London · New York · Prag / BA 8196 [8197] [I: 1993, II: 1994].

    Contains Mendelssohn's Preface in German and English. A brief critical commentary in German appears at the end of each volume. Bärenreiter's promotional assertion, that “this complete edition of Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy's organ works is at present the only one” (“Vorliegende gegenwärtig einzige Gesamtausgabe der Orgelwerke Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdys… ”) was incorrect, as reviewers have pointedly noted.8

  20. 17. Leipziger Ausgabe der Werke von / Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy / herausgegeben von der / Sächsischen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Leipzig / Serie IV, Klavier- und Orgelwerke / Band 6 [7, 8] / sigl. / Breitkopf & Härtel / Wiesbaden · Leipzig · Paris || Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy/ Orgelwerke I / Kompositionen mit Opuszahlen / herausgegeben von / Christian Martin Schmidt / sigl. / Breitkopf & Härtel / Wiesbaden · Leipzig · Paris / 2005

    Orgelwerke II / Kompositionen ohne Opuszahlen / von 1820 bis 1841 / herausgegeben von / Christian Martin Schmidt / sigl. / Breitkopf & Härtel / Wiesbaden · Leipzig ·Paris / 2004.

    Orgelwerke III / Kompositionen ohne Opuszahlen / von 1844 und 1845 / herausgegeben von / Christian Martin Schmidt / sigl. / Breitkopf & Härtel / Wiesbaden ·Leipzig · Paris / 2005.

    Part of the recently resuscitated Leipzig edition of Mendelssohn's complete works, the three volumes contain an extensive critical apparatus.

Although Russell Saunders (1921–1992) never edited an edition of Mendelssohn's organ works, he is widely recognized as one of America's most influential organ teachers during the latter years of the twentieth century. His thoughts about performance practice not only regarding (p.413) Mendelssohn but other composers of the Bach and post-Bach eras as well have exerted a profound influence on the organ community both here and abroad, and consequently his tempo suggestions for Opp. 37 and 65 have been included here.

Comparative Metronome Markings In Seven Editions Of Opp. 37 And 65

Mendelssohn

Warren†

Lemare

E-Hull

Kraft

Dupré

Saunders

1. Praeludium

𝅗𝅥 = 76

𝅗𝅥 = 80

𝅗𝅥 = 96

𝅗𝅥 = 80

𝅗𝅥 = 63

𝅗𝅥 = 80

Fuga

𝅘𝅥. = 76

𝅘𝅥. = 88

𝅘𝅥. = 88

𝅘𝅥. = 82

𝅘𝅥. = 66

𝅘𝅥. = 74

2. Praeludium

𝅘𝅥. = 60

𝅘𝅥. = 60

𝅘𝅥. = 60

𝅘𝅥. = 60

𝅘𝅥. = 44

𝅘𝅥. = 60

Fuga

𝅗𝅥 = 66

𝅗𝅥 = 76

𝅗𝅥 = 72

𝅗𝅥 = 76

𝅗𝅥 = 66

𝅗𝅥 = 70

3. Praeludium

𝅗𝅥 = 69

𝅗𝅥 = 76

𝅗𝅥 = 72

𝅗𝅥 = 76

𝅗𝅥 = 69

𝅗𝅥 = 74

Fuga

𝅗𝅥 = 66

𝅗𝅥 = 72

𝅗𝅥 = 72

𝅗𝅥 = 72

𝅗𝅥 = 74

𝅗𝅥 = 74

(p.414)

Six Sonatas for the Organ—Opus 65

Mendelssohn

Lemare

E-Hull

Kraft

Dupré

Saunders

I.

1. Allegro moderato e serioso

𝅘𝅥 = 92

𝅘𝅥 = 104

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 92

𝅘𝅥 = c. 108

2. Adagio

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 100

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 72

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 72

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 72

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 100

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = c. 86

3. Andante Recitativo

𝅘𝅥 = 80

𝅘𝅥 = 60*

𝅘𝅥 = 60

𝅘𝅥 = 80*

𝅘𝅥 = 72

𝅘𝅥 = 84

4. Allegro assai vivace

𝅘𝅥 = 88

𝅗𝅥 = 112

𝅗𝅥 = 112

𝅗𝅥 = 92

𝅗𝅥 = 88

𝅗𝅥 = 94

II.

1. Grave

𝅘𝅥 = 69

𝅘𝅥 = 56

𝅘𝅥 = 60

𝅘𝅥 = 63

𝅘𝅥 = 60

𝅘𝅥 = 69

2. Adagio

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 72

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 60

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 60

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 60

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 72

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 66

3. Allegro maestoso e vivace

𝅘𝅥 = 92

𝅘𝅥 = 112

𝅘𝅥 = 108

𝅘𝅥 = 116

𝅘𝅥 = 96

𝅘𝅥 = 98

4. Fuga

𝅘𝅥 = 132

𝅗𝅥 = 66

𝅗𝅥 = 66

𝅘𝅥 = 132

𝅘𝅥 = 108

𝅗𝅥 = 76

III.

1. Con moto maestoso

𝅘𝅥 = 72

𝅘𝅥 = 60

𝅘𝅥 = 72

𝅘𝅥 = 60

𝅘𝅥 = 66

𝅘𝅥 = 76

piu animato e piu forte

𝅘𝅥 = 72>100

𝅘𝅥 = 72>112

𝅘𝅥 = 72>120

𝅘𝅥 = 72>100

𝅘𝅥 = 66>112

𝅘𝅥 = 88

tempo primo

𝅘𝅥 = 72

𝅘𝅥 = 60

𝅘𝅥 = 60

𝅘𝅥 = 76

𝅘𝅥 = 66

𝅘𝅥 = 76

2. Andante tranquillo

𝅘𝅥 = 76

𝅘𝅥 = 60

𝅘𝅥 = 60

𝅘𝅥 = 60

𝅘𝅥 = 72

𝅘𝅥 = 68

IV.

1. Allegro con brio

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 84

𝅘𝅥 = 94

2. Andante religioso

𝅘𝅥 = 84

𝅘𝅥 = 76

𝅘𝅥 = 76

𝅘𝅥 = 72

𝅘𝅥 = 72

𝅘𝅥 = 78

3. Allegretto

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 138

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 120

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 120

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 120

𝅘𝅥 = 54

𝅘𝅥. = 144

4. Allegro maestoso e vivace

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 94

V.

1. Andante

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 80

𝅘𝅥 = 80

𝅘𝅥 = 92

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 100

2. Andante con moto

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 126

𝅘𝅥. = 56

𝅘𝅥. = 56

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 126

𝅘𝅥. = 52

𝅘𝅥. = 52

3. Allegro maestoso

𝅘𝅥 = 126

𝅘𝅥 = 132

𝅘𝅥 = 132

𝅘𝅥 = 126

𝅘𝅥 = 126

𝅗𝅥 = 70

VI.

1. Choral

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 76

𝅘𝅥 = 76

𝅘𝅥 = 84

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 100

Andante sostenuto

𝅘𝅥 = 63

𝅘𝅥. = 63

𝅘𝅥 = 63

𝅘𝅥 = 63

𝅘𝅥 = 72

𝅘𝅥 = 63

12/8

𝅘𝅥. = 63

𝅘𝅥. = 63

𝅘𝅥. = 63

𝅘𝅥. = 63

𝅘𝅥. = 63

𝅘𝅥. = 63

C

𝅘𝅥 = 63

𝅘𝅥 = 58

𝅘𝅥 = 56

𝅘𝅥 = 58

𝅘𝅥 = 58

𝅘𝅥 = 58

Allegro molto

𝅗𝅥 = 69

𝅗𝅥 = 80

𝅗𝅥 = 80

𝅗𝅥 = 69

𝅗𝅥 = 66

𝅗𝅥 = 66

2. Fuga - sostenuto e legato

𝅘𝅥 = 96

𝅘𝅥 = 108

𝅘𝅥 = 104

𝅘𝅥 = 100

𝅘𝅥 = 96

𝅘𝅥 = 100

3. Finale - Andante

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 100

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 76

𝅘𝅥 = 76**

𝅘𝅥 = 76**

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 84

𝅘𝅥𝅮 = 96

() Warren's metronome marks for the Sonatas are the same as Mendelssohn's. quasi ** [sic.]

Notes:

(1.) Edition Breitkopf, plate no. 8299, series 12, no. 83.

(2.) The new edition bore the plate no. 8521.

(3.) Edition Breitkopf, plate no. 8088 (1980).

(4.) Felix Mendelssohn, Kompositionen für Orgel: Erstausgabe. Leipzig, 1974. Reprints appeared in 1977 and 1984.

(5.) W. T. Best, Foreword. Examples supplied: Sonata I.1, mm. 28–31; Sonata III.2, mm. 31–34; Sonata IV.4, mm. 40–43, etc.

(6.) Bark (1935, 438–39).

(7.) I am grateful to Rollin Smith for this information.

(8.) Williams (1994, 152–53) and Langley (1995).