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Global Pentecostal and Charismatic Healing$
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Candy Gunther Brown

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195393408

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195393408.001.0001

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Jesus as the Great Physician: Pentecostal Native North Americans within the Assemblies of God and New Understandings of Pentecostal Healing

Jesus as the Great Physician: Pentecostal Native North Americans within the Assemblies of God and New Understandings of Pentecostal Healing

Chapter:
(p.107) 5 Jesus as the Great Physician: Pentecostal Native North Americans within the Assemblies of God and New Understandings of Pentecostal Healing
Source:
Global Pentecostal and Charismatic Healing
Author(s):

Angela Tarango

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195393408.003.0006

By the 1920s, when the Assemblies of God began its Home Missions, centuries of colonization and missionaries had wrecked traditional Native American life. North American Native Pentecostals entered a new world of belief but blended Native and Pentecostal bodily experiences of singing, dancing, and healing. Struggling for autonomy, Native leaders implemented the “indigenous principle”—rooting Pentecostalism within their own cultures. Native Pentecostals redefined healing to meet their needs as colonized peoples: emphasizing healing from bitterness of past wrongs, racism, paternalism, and breaches of trust by White missionaries, and focused on reconciliation and divine judgment. Native missionaries fought stereotypes and misconceptions through publications about the Cherokee Trail of Tears and Navajo Long Walk. Native Pentecostals pushed the flexible boundaries of Pentecostalism and worked out their own religious identities—embracing their Pentecostal and Native halves and laying the groundwork for the modern racial reconciliation movement among Promise Keepers and the Christian Right.

Keywords:   Canada, United States, Native American, Home Missions, colonization, bodily experience, indigenous principle, racial reconciliation movement, Promise Keepers, Christian Right

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