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Why Political Liberalism?On John Rawls's Political Turn$
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Paul Weithman

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195393033

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195393033.001.0001

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The Political Ideals of Justice as Fairness

The Political Ideals of Justice as Fairness

Chapter:
(p.270) IX The Political Ideals of Justice as Fairness
Source:
Why Political Liberalism?
Author(s):

Paul Weithman (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195393033.003.0010

This chapter begins to show how the changes Rawls made between Theory of Justice and Political Liberalism—listed in the Introduction—respond to the failures he found in his arguments for congruence. The chapter lays out what is referred to here as the “basic stability argument” found in Political Liberalism, an argument intended—like the stability arguments of Theory of Justice—that the well-ordered society would not be undermined by a generalized prisoner's dilemma. It explains subtle changes Rawls made in his discussion of moral development and shows why the notion of congruence, which bulked so large in Rawls's early treatment of stability, plays so little role in his later one.

Keywords:   moral development, ideal, ideal-dependent desires, congruence, ideal of citizenship, ideal of democratic governance, political analogues

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