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The Unsustainable American State$
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Lawrence Jacobs and Desmond King

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195392135

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195392135.001.0001

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Economic Inequality and Political Representation

Economic Inequality and Political Representation

Chapter:
(p.167) 7 Economic Inequality and Political Representation
Source:
The Unsustainable American State
Author(s):

Larry M. Bartels

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195392135.003.0007

This chapter reveals how increasing economic inequality among Americans engenders political inequality as well. Though every citizen should equally count in the area of politics and government in a democratic state, this chapter argues that affluent constituents are given more importance by public officials. Taken into account representation by US senators in the late 1980s and early 1990s, senators during this period were more responsive to the views of the elite while those with lower incomes were not considered in the policy making process. Though various reasons are presented on the reason for this disparity, the chapter reflects on the idea that affluent constituent's propensity to contribute to political campaigns are greater than less affluent ones.

Keywords:   economic inequality, democratic state, affluent constituents, policy making process, campaigns

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