Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Brother-Making in Late Antiquity and Byzantium
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Brother-Making in Late Antiquity and Byzantium: Monks, Laymen, and Christian Ritual

Claudia Rapp

Abstract

Among medieval Christian societies, Byzantium is unique in preserving an ecclesiastical ritual of adelphopoiesis, which pronounces two men as brothers. It has its origin as a spiritual blessing in the monastic world of Late Antiquity, becomes a popular social networking strategy among laypeople from the ninth century onwards, and still finds application in recent times. Located at the intersection of religious and social history, brother-making exemplifies how social practice can become ritualized and subsequently subjected to attempts of ecclesiastical and legal control. The purpose and appli ... More

Keywords: Byzantium, social history, church history, monasticism, male-male relations, adelphopoiesis, Late Antiquity

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2016 Print ISBN-13: 9780195389333
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2016 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195389333.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Claudia Rapp, author
Institute for Medieval Studies, Austrian Academy of Sciences