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Brain–Computer InterfacesPrinciples and Practice$
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Jonathan Wolpaw and Elizabeth Winter Wolpaw

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780195388855

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195388855.001.0001

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Ethical Issues in BCI Research

Ethical Issues in BCI Research

Chapter:
24 Ethical Issues in BCI Research
Source:
Brain–Computer Interfaces
Author(s):

Mary-Jane Schneider

Joseph J. Fins

Jonathan R. Wolpaw

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195388855.003.0024

This chapter discusses the ethical issues raised by brain-computer interface (BCI) research in humans. It is organized around the three principles set out in the Belmont Report of 1978, which is generally considered the founding document of modern human research standards. The three principles are beneficence, respect for persons, and justice. Beneficence requires that the potential benefits of human research (to humanity and perhaps to the research subjects) far outweigh its risks to the subjects. Respect for persons requires that informed consent be obtained from the subjects. Justice requires that the benefits and burdens of the research be fairly distributed.

Keywords:   brain-computer interface research, Belmont Report, modern human research, beneficence, respect for persons, justice

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