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The Unfamiliar AbodeIslamic Law in the United States and Britain$
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Kathleen Moore

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195387810

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387810.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.153) Epilogue
Source:
The Unfamiliar Abode
Author(s):

Kathleen M. Moore (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387810.003.0006

This epilogue summarizes the insights gleaned from juxtaposing circumstances and discursive projects in the United States and Britain. It reviews how deeply rooted the images of the Muslim Other are in the unfamiliar abode, specifically in the institutionalized practices of governance. It highlights how the formulation of a new diasporic legality takes on the internal logic of Anglo-American legal conventions while at the same time resisting them. This argument has one foot planted in each debate: from a Muslim vantage point, over what kinds of space the United States and Britain are; from the dominant American and British vantage point, over the status of their own countries as the nations and pluralist societies they are or may become. The emphasis is on how a language to normalize Muslim presence in the United States and Britain shows the intersection of the processes of globalization with local practices of legal interpretation, and gives us a deeper understanding of the inner struggle to be pluralists under exceptional circumstances.

Keywords:   Islam, United States, Britain, Muslims, diaspora, diasporic legality

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