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The Toughest BeatPolitics, Punishment, and the Prison Officers Union in California$
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Joshua Page

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195384055

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195384055.001.0001

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Who Rules the Beat The Battle Over Managerial Rights

Who Rules the Beat The Battle Over Managerial Rights

Chapter:
(p.160) Chapter 7 Who Rules the Beat The Battle Over Managerial Rights
Source:
The Toughest Beat
Author(s):

Joshua Page (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195384055.003.0007

This chapter analyzes struggles between the CCPOA and the state over “managerial rights”—the ability to make and implement policies concerning prison administration. It traces how the CCPOA has reduced managerial authority and discretion over key workplace functions, decreased managers’ capacity for monitoring and disciplining workers, and enhanced the ability of the CCPOA and its members to contest and influence workplace policies and procedures. The union’s success in the battle over managerial rights is due, in large part, to the comparative weakness of the state’s penal agencies—that is, California’s perennial lack of administrative capacity. The CCPOA’s victories in the battle over managerial rights further weaken the state bureaucracies, thereby reinforcing the union’s superior position in the field in a cyclical fashion.

Keywords:   managerial rights, CCPOA, administration, penal agencies, administrative capacity, bureaucracies

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