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Advances in Culture and PsychologyVolume 1$
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Michele J. Gelfand, Chi-yue Chiu, and Ying-yi Hong

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195380392

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195380392.001.0001

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Attachment, Learning, and Coping

Attachment, Learning, and Coping

The Interplay of Cultural Similarities and Differences

Chapter:
(p.153) Chapter 4 Attachment, Learning, and Coping
Source:
Advances in Culture and Psychology
Author(s):

Fred Rothbaum

Gilda Morelli

Natalie Rusk

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195380392.003.0004

The chapter discusses similarities and differences in attachment relationships across cultures. They propose that cultural differences in attachment relate to cultural differences in learning and coping. In European American communities, where the attachment relationship is experienced as a base for exploring and analyzing the world, children who are secure develop change-based ways of coping. In other communities, where children develop attachments that serve as a base for learning to accommodate to a world they see holistically, secure children are likely to develop acceptance-based ways of coping. Implications for insecurity are discussed: Avoidant strategies are more likely when change-based coping is emphasized, and anxious-resistant strategies are more likely when acceptance-based coping is emphasized. These differences in attachment, learning and coping take root in situations that foster a particular sense of self (independent or interdependent), perspective (first-person or third-person) and perception of control (primary or secondary).

Keywords:   attachment, security, culture, coping, secondary control, avoidant insecurity, anxious-resistant insecurity, exploration, accommodation, analytic versus holistic

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