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For Liberty and EqualityThe Life and Times of the Declaration of Independence$
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Alexander Tsesis

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780195379693

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195379693.001.0001

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Subordination

Subordination

Chapter:
(p.100) 7 Subordination
Source:
For Liberty and Equality
Author(s):

Alexander Tsesis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195379693.003.0007

Popular involvement in government and policy making grew significantly during Andrew Jackson's presidency, but not all segments of society benefited equally. The Declaration of Independence continued to be a clarion call for a wide variety of social movements such as those advocating an end to business monopolies, the opening of public lands to settlers, the creation of common schools, and expansion of women's rights. Human rights debates about African Americans' and women's rights were even more contentious than those involving workers. If laborers needed public education to compete in an industrial economy, their grievances paled in comparison with those of slaves to whom southern laws denied the most basic rights (such as literacy), or married women who could not vote, no matter how well read.

Keywords:   Declaration of Independence, social movements, slavery, liberal equality

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