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Colonial CounterpointMusic in Early Modern Manila$
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D. R. M. Irving

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195378269

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195378269.001.0001

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Fiesta filipina: Celebrations in Manila

Fiesta filipina: Celebrations in Manila

Chapter:
(p.215) 8 Fiesta filipina: Celebrations in Manila
Source:
Colonial Counterpoint
Author(s):

D. R. M. Irving

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195378269.003.0009

This chapter provides an overview of festivities (fiestas) in early modern Manila, arguing that musical practice provided a focal point of interface between differing cultures, races, and religions. It explores the ways in which different communities in Manila expressed collective identities through music, and contends that although some degree of temporary social liberation was embodied in these performances, fiestas essentially reinforced rigid hierarchies of class and race within colonial society. The chapter surveys musical performances in festivities for royal occasions, celebrations honoring the entries of important personages to the city (including a Sultan of Sulu, 'Azīm ud‐Dīn I), observances of beatifications and canonizations, and seasonal and votive festivities. Finally, it considers the question of whether fiestas in early modern Manila promoted racial integration or racial segregation.

Keywords:   festivities (fiestas), interface, royal, entries, beatifications, canonizations, seasonal, votive, racial integration, racial segregation

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