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World Upside DownReading Acts in the Graeco-Roman Age$
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C. Kavin Rowe

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195377873

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195377873.001.0001

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The Apocalypse of Acts and the Life of Truth

The Apocalypse of Acts and the Life of Truth

Chapter:
(p.139) 5 The Apocalypse of Acts and the Life of Truth
Source:
World Upside Down
Author(s):

C. Kavin Rowe (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195377873.003.0005

Reading Acts as lively political theology in its time necessarily raises questions that directly relate to several crucial contemporary problems. Indeed, the argument is that engaging Acts in this way offers significant resources on which modern thinkers can draw to understand conflicts that arise in light of profoundly different schemes of life. “God,” “tolerance,” “diversity,” “culture,” and “religious violence” are words that explicitly point to issues requiring sustained and refined reflection in the 21st century. After a condensed exposition of the reading of Acts given in Chapters 2 through 4, therefore, this final chapter pursues several critical questions that attend the interrelation between claims to universal truth about God and the politics they produce (e.g., the nature of religious truth, the relation between normative truth claims and tolerance of the religious other, the political significance of polytheism, etc.).

Keywords:   truth claims, polytheism, religious tolerance, cultural translation, diversity, violence, social imaginary, Charles Taylor, Jan Assmann

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