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Then A Miracle OccursFocusing on Behavior in Social Psychological Theory and Research$
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Christopher R. Agnew, Donal E. Carlston, William G. Graziano, and Janice R. Kelly

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195377798

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195377798.001.0001

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Distinguishing Between Prediction and Influence: Multiple Processes Underlying Attitude-Behavior Consistency

Distinguishing Between Prediction and Influence: Multiple Processes Underlying Attitude-Behavior Consistency

Chapter:
(p.162) 9 Distinguishing Between Prediction and Influence: Multiple Processes Underlying Attitude-Behavior Consistency
Source:
Then A Miracle Occurs
Author(s):

Leandre R. Fabrigar

Duane T. Wegener

Tara K. MacDonald

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195377798.003.0009

The authors present a general framework for organizing the moderators of the attitude-behavior relationships suggested in the literature, focusing on several central distinctions. First, they distinguish between predictions of behavior and mechanisms that might actually mediate the underlying attitude-behavior link. The first category of moderators includes the kinds of measurement issues postulated by Fishbein and his colleagues—issues that are potentially germane to efforts to predict behavior from any individual difference variable. The chapter distinguishes mediational mechanisms further along lines suggested by dual-processing theory, into those involving low-deliberation behaviors and those involving high deliberation behaviors. The former includes perceptual and behavioral cuing effects that could implicate habitual or nonconscious processes similar to those described in Chapters 5 and 6. The latter arguably encompasses both higher-level propositional reasoning and biased information processing.

Keywords:   attitude, behavior, attitude-behavior consistency, dual-process theory, moderator variables, social psychology

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