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Simultaneous EEG and fMRIRecording, Analysis, and Application$
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Markus Ullsperger and Stefan Debener

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195372731

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195372731.001.0001

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Physiological Basis of the BOLD Signal

Physiological Basis of the BOLD Signal

Chapter:
(p.21) 1.2 Physiological Basis of the BOLD Signal
Source:
Simultaneous EEG and fMRI
Author(s):

Jozien Goense

Nikos K. Logothetis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195372731.003.0002

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and other non-invasive imaging methods have greatly expanded our knowledge of human brain function. Although MRI was invented in the early 1970s and has been used clinically since the mid-1980s, its use in cognitive neuroscience expanded greatly with the advent of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional imaging, and by now, fMRI is a mainstay of neuroscience research. This chapter gives an overview of the relation between the BOLD signal and the underlying neural signals. It focuses on intracortically recorded neural signals, recorded with microelectrodes.

Keywords:   fMRI, brain imaging, blood oxygenation level, neural signals

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