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Simultaneous EEG and fMRIRecording, Analysis, and Application$
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Markus Ullsperger and Stefan Debener

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195372731

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195372731.001.0001

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Linking Band-Limited Cortical Activity to fMRI and Behavior

Linking Band-Limited Cortical Activity to fMRI and Behavior

Chapter:
(p.271) 4.1 Linking Band-Limited Cortical Activity to fMRI and Behavior
Source:
Simultaneous EEG and fMRI
Author(s):

Markus Siegel

Tobias H. Donner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195372731.003.0017

This chapter addresses the relationship of band-limited electrophysiological mass activity to behavior on the one hand, and to the BOLD fMRI signal on the other. Electrophysiological mass activity generally reflects several different components of neuronal activity, which are generated by distinct neural mechanisms and expressed in different frequency ranges. The relative strengths of these components thus determine a so-called specific spectral fingerprint of a perceptual or cognitive process. A striking discrepancy between the spectral fingerprint of stimulus-driven responses in sensory cortices and the fingerprints of intrinsic processes (such as top-down attention or switches between perceptual states) within the same cortical areas is highlighted. It is proposed that this dissociation reflects recurrent interactions between distant cortical areas and/or neuromodulation of cortical activity patterns by ascending systems, which are both thought to play an important role in such processes.

Keywords:   electrophysiological population signals, cognitive processing, sensory processing, spectral fingerprints, fMRI

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