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Building BlocksRepetition and Continuity in the Music of Stravinsky$
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Gretchen Horlacher

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195370867

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195370867.001.0001

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Multiple Melodies

Multiple Melodies

Stravinsky's Superimpositions

Chapter:
(p.129) 4 Multiple Melodies
Source:
Building Blocks
Author(s):

Gretchen G. Horlacher (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195370867.003.0004

Chapter 3 explored the melodic measurement of repeated voices, that is, how ordered succession can be measured through the repetition and variation of single lines. These melodic measurements are defined by five spectra, two of which gauge the interplay among individual repetitions as they occur in succession. The measurements characterize the interaction of motion and stasis within a melody and among its iterations, providing explanations for how we may experience Stravinsky's manipulation of time both as a series of static, present-tense moments and as a particular expression of passage, be it reaching forward, decelerating, or progressing at a steady rate. Some of these analyses also describe how a repeating melody is part of a fuller, layered texture, and it was informally suggested how those superimposed lines interact with the melody. This chapter now turns to a more formal consideration of superimposition, one that focuses on the special ways in which time is manipulated in these textures. Superimposed textures provide a particularly rich environment in which to intertwine motion and stasis. Criteria are developed to measure the nature and extent of that interaction, ranging from the near-heterophonous to the tight relations of a counterpoint.

Keywords:   Igor Stravinsky, superimposition, time, superimposed textures, counterpoint

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