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Music, Criticism, and the Challenge of HistoryShaping Modern Musical Thought in Late Nineteenth Century Vienna$
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Kevin Karnes

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195368666

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195368666.001.0001

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MUSIC CRITICISM AS LIVING HISTORY

MUSIC CRITICISM AS LIVING HISTORY

Chapter:
(p.48) CHAPTER TWO MUSIC CRITICISM AS LIVING HISTORY
Source:
Music, Criticism, and the Challenge of History
Author(s):

Kevin C. Karnes

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195368666.003.0003

This chapter takes a close look at Hanslick's writings published after his abandonment of Austrian Herbartianism in the mid-1860s. It argues that Hanslick, after producing a Hegelian history of Viennese musical life in 1869, soon rejected Hegel's philosophy of history as well, and spent his remaining thirty-four years elaborating a novel and avowedly subjective historiography of music that placed the experiences of the listening subject at the center of the historical narrative. Examining the contents of his resulting twelve books, which he collectively called a “living history” of Viennese concert life, the chapter suggests that the latter project constituted Hanslick's contribution to a broad and diffuse movement among some late-century historians and philosophers—including Nietzsche, Windelband, and Jacob Burckhardt—who questioned the pretense to objectivity in the work of their positivist colleagues and insisted upon the inherently subjective nature of all historical observations.

Keywords:   Burckhardt, Hanslick, Hegel, Herbart, historiography, Nietzsche, positivism, subjectivity, Vienna, Windelband

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