Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Fourth AmendmentOrigins and Original Meaning 602 - 1791$

William J. Cuddihy

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195367195

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195367195.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy). Subscriber: null; date: 20 October 2017

(p.825) APPENDIX D-7 “Record Gaps”: Towns with Records Commencing before 1754 but Missing When Massachusetts Towns Debated the Excise Bill of 1754 (3 towns)

(p.825) APPENDIX D-7 “Record Gaps”: Towns with Records Commencing before 1754 but Missing When Massachusetts Towns Debated the Excise Bill of 1754 (3 towns)

Source:
The Fourth Amendment
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Blandford (Hampshire Co.). “Miscellaneous Records, 1737–1773. Town of Blandford” (L. D. S. Film no. 0186138) is unfoliated and apparently complete but, excepting 05 Feb. 1755, documents no town meetings between 19 March 1753 and 24 March 1758.

Falmouth (Barnstable Co.). Falmouth’s “Records” (L. D. S. Film no. 904590) spans 1750–1812 but lacks both volume and folio numbers and is vacant of town meetings between 24 Oct. 1753 and 03 Mar. 1756.

Montague District (Hampshire Co.). “Town Record 1. Montague [1719–1832]” (L. D. S. Film no. 0886883) is irregularly paginated and mingles land, town meeting, and marriage records. The only recorded meetings are the first one on 29 July 1751 and those of 1 or 11 [?] Dec. 1755, and 08 Mar. 1756, at about folios 43, 50, and 88. The ms. begins with a letter by Robert J. Swan, state Commissioner of Public Records, to N. O. Bardwell, the Montgue town clerk, on 30 Sept. 1890, noting that folios 91–98 are missing and pagination unconventional. Much of that pagination, legible over a century ago, is no longer so.