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The Shocking History of Electric FishesFrom Ancient Epochs to the Birth of Modern Neurophysiology$
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Stanley Finger and Marco Piccolino

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195366723

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195366723.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.416) Epilogue
Source:
The Shocking History of Electric Fishes
Author(s):

Stanley Finger

Marco Piccolino

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195366723.003.0027

This chapter presents a summary of the discussions in the preceding chapters and presents some concluding thoughts. Electric fish basically guided nerve and muscle studies late in the 18th century and pretty much through the first half of the 19th century. Then, in the closing decades of the 19th century and into the middle of the 20th century, the table turned and nerve and muscle studies opened the needed doors for understanding how the electric organs of fish actually function. In the second half of the 20th century, the give-and-take between these closely related fields seemed to shift again, with new studies of electric fishes guiding and confirming thinking about nerve and muscle ion channels, and more.

Keywords:   electric fishes, electricity, nerves, muscles

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