Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Eloquent OboeA History of the Hautboy from 1640 to 1760$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Bruce Haynes

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195337259

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195337259.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 November 2017

Afterword

Afterword

Chapter:
Afterword
Source:
The Eloquent Oboe
Author(s):

Bruce Haynes

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195337259.003.0009

The hautboy continued to evolve, and the next general form was the Type D2, the classical model, which served as the base to which a key-system was eventually applied in the 1820s. The 19th century will be an interesting challenge for historians of the oboe. To understand it better (and its direct precursor, the classical period) will be to gain deeper insight into the nature of both the period before and the one that followed; the Romantic oboe was created in reaction to the principles of the 18th century, a kind of “negative image” of the hautboy. And of course it acted as the root of what was to become the ideal wood instrument of the 20th century. The evolution of the hautboy represented a series of brilliant responses to the demands of one of the more dynamic phases in the history of Western music.

Keywords:   hautboy, history, oboe, Western music

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .