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Implicit Motives$
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Oliver Schultheiss and Joachim Brunstein

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195335156

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195335156.001.0001

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Assessing Individual Differences in Achievement Motivation with the Implicit Association Test: Predictive Validity of a Chronometric Measure of the Self-Concept “Me = Successful”

Assessing Individual Differences in Achievement Motivation with the Implicit Association Test: Predictive Validity of a Chronometric Measure of the Self-Concept “Me = Successful”

Chapter:
(p.151) Chapter 6 Assessing Individual Differences in Achievement Motivation with the Implicit Association Test: Predictive Validity of a Chronometric Measure of the Self-Concept “Me = Successful”
Source:
Implicit Motives
Author(s):

Joachim C. Brunstein

Clemens H. Schmitt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195335156.003.0006

This chapter explores potential links between thematic and chronometric methods of measuring implicit motives. It begins with a brief overview of the strengths and weaknesses inherent in thematic measures of motivational preferences. It then argues that reaction time-based measures (e.g., priming procedures) of implicit social cognitions can provide important insights into how implicit motives work and translate into goal-directed action. To exemplify this position, this chapter summarizes a number of studies examining the predictive validity of an Implicit Association Test designed to assess individual differences in achievement motivation. On this basis, it is argued that the field of implicit motives can benefit from an exchange of ideas with several important lines of social cognitive research on the automatic nature of motivational concerns.

Keywords:   implicit motives, priming, automaticity, implicit association test, achievement motivation

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