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Handbook of International Social WorkHuman Rights, Development, and the Global Profession$
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Lynne M. Healy and Rosemary J. Link

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195333619

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333619.001.0001

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Women and the Human Rights Framework

Women and the Human Rights Framework

Chapter:
(p.447) 67 Women and the Human Rights Framework
Source:
Handbook of International Social Work
Author(s):

Elisabeth Reichert

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333619.003.0067

The primary goal of the social work profession is to work with diverse populations. Perhaps the largest of these populations encompasses women and the girl child. Historically, this population has encountered significant discrimination. Women perform two-thirds of the world's work but earn only one-tenth of all income and own less than one-tenth of the world's property. Two-thirds of the children in the world who are not receiving an education are girls. Women constitute the majority of the world's poor as defined by income level. A woman's access to resources, work, housing, education, and other advantages often determines the level of power she possesses. For that reason, when considering the application of human rights, social workers should always acknowledge how differences in power among groups can result in discrimination and inequality.

Keywords:   women's rights, human rights, gender inequality, social work practice

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