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Handbook of International Social WorkHuman Rights, Development, and the Global Profession$
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Lynne M. Healy and Rosemary J. Link

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195333619

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333619.001.0001

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Social Work in North America

Social Work in North America

Chapter:
(p.400) 61 Social Work in North America
Source:
Handbook of International Social Work
Author(s):

Julia Watkins

Therese Jennissen

Colleen Lundy

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333619.003.0061

This chapter presents an overview of social work in Canada and the United States. Social work in both countries emerged at the turn of the 20th century as a response to the serious health and social problems that accompanied industrial expansion and the rise in immigration. The close relationship between Canadian and American social workers has endured through the centuries; however, there were differences in their development that were rooted in indigenous social issues. Canada has a strong French tradition, its relationship with its Aboriginal populations has developed in a particular way, and the existence of large rural and northern populations has presented unique issues for social workers. Differences aside, social workers in Canada and the United States are facing similar challenges, namely sustaining a social welfare state and advancing equality in the context of neoliberalism.

Keywords:   social work practice, Canada, United States, social welfare state, social equality, neoliberalism

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