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Handbook of International Social WorkHuman Rights, Development, and the Global Profession$
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Lynne M. Healy and Rosemary J. Link

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195333619

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333619.001.0001

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Drugs: Addictions and Trafficking

Drugs: Addictions and Trafficking

Chapter:
(p.172) 25 Drugs: Addictions and Trafficking
Source:
Handbook of International Social Work
Author(s):

Katherine van Wormer

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333619.003.0025

This chapter focuses on drug use and the drug trafficking that sustains it. Because alcohol is also a drug and is closely associated with addiction worldwide, attention is paid to its use and abuse as well. Following an introductory discussion of the nature of addiction, the chapter describes drug trafficking as a global enterprise with an effect on every continent. It examines two approaches to the problem of the drug trade. The first, which is favored by the US government, involves a declaration of war on the suppliers and users of drugs. The second approach is geared toward reducing the demand for drugs through harm reduction; this approach is favored in Europe and is rapidly gaining proponents elsewhere. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the principles of harm reduction and implications for the social work profession.

Keywords:   drug use, drug trafficking, alcohol abuse, addiction, social work practice, harm reduction

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