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Handbook of International Social WorkHuman Rights, Development, and the Global Profession$
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Lynne M. Healy and Rosemary J. Link

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195333619

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333619.001.0001

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Social Exclusion and Inclusion

Social Exclusion and Inclusion

Chapter:
(p.37) 6 Social Exclusion and Inclusion
Source:
Handbook of International Social Work
Author(s):

Karen Lyons

Nathalie Huegler

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333619.003.0006

The notion of social exclusion and the need to implement policies and programs that combat marginalization and facilitate social inclusion has gained currency in many parts of the world over the past few decades. Social exclusion is often associated with poverty: In a World Bank survey of what poverty means to people who are poor, the respondents identified that poverty is not just a lack of material goods but extends to lack of power; feelings of dependence and inferiority; injustice, exclusion and lack of opportunities; and receipt of poor quality social services. However, just as poverty might prevent people from fully participating in civil society, so some populations may feel marginalized or excluded by the attitudes and behaviors of neighbors, institutions, and whole political systems. This chapter examines the theoretical origins of the concept of social exclusion, gives some examples of particular policies and programs aimed at addressing social exclusion, and considers how the concept might have global relevance in the context of social workers' concerns with human rights and global citizenship.

Keywords:   social exclusion, social inclusion, poverty, marginalization, social work practice, human rights, global citizenship

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