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The Science of Social Vision$
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Reginald B. Adams, Nalini Ambady, Ken Nakayama, and Shinsuke Shimojo

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195333176

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333176.001.0001

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Gaze Perception and Visually Mediated Attention

Gaze Perception and Visually Mediated Attention

Chapter:
(p.108) Chapter 6 Gaze Perception and Visually Mediated Attention
Source:
The Science of Social Vision
Author(s):

Stephen R. H. Langton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333176.003.0007

This chapter reviews some of the work on the perception of gaze direction and shifting of attention, which is triggered by eye gaze. The evidence suggests that the excellent accuracy we display in perceiving gaze is underpinned by at least two mechanisms—one analyzing luminance contrast, the other performing a spatial computation on the eye's features—and must take into account the orientation of the gazer's head. Both of the mechanisms for perceiving gaze also seem to be involved in the generation of shifts of attention in the direction in which another's eyes are pointing and do so via dedicated neural circuitry.

Keywords:   eye gaze, attention, gaze direction, gaze judgments, gaze perception

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