Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Science of Social Vision$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Reginald B. Adams, Nalini Ambady, Ken Nakayama, and Shinsuke Shimojo

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195333176

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333176.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 October 2017

Side Bias: Cerebral Hemispheric Asymmetry in Social Cognition and Emotion Perception

Side Bias: Cerebral Hemispheric Asymmetry in Social Cognition and Emotion Perception

Chapter:
(p.393) CHAPTER 22 Side Bias: Cerebral Hemispheric Asymmetry in Social Cognition and Emotion Perception
Source:
The Science of Social Vision
Author(s):

Kimberley R. Savage

Joan C. Borod

Lorraine O. Ramig

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333176.003.0023

This chapter characterizes the nature of the hemispheric biases in social cognition. This includes both description and discussion of the literature examining the extent of hemispheric specialization in firstly how we identify and interpret the mental states of other people, and secondly how we perceive emotion. Overall, research continues to demonstrate the importance of the right cerebral hemisphere for social cognitive processes. The role of the right hemisphere is most apparent in studies involving patients with brain damage(i.e., the brain lesion approach)and in studies of healthy participants using behavioral paradigms, such as chimeric faces or tachistoscopic procedures.

Keywords:   social cognition, hemispheric bias, mental states, emotion perception, right cerebral hemisphere, human brain

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .