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American LazarusReligion and the Rise of African American and Native American Literatures$

Joanna Brooks

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195332919

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195332919.001.0001

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Source:
American Lazarus
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Bibliography references:

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