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Brother's KeeperThe United States, Race, and Empire in the British Caribbean, 1937-1962$
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Jason C. Parker

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195332025

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195332025.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.3) Introduction
Source:
Brother's Keeper
Author(s):

Janson C. Parker (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195332025.003.0001

Describes the aim, scope, and themes of the book. Argues that recovering the story of West Indian decolonization contributes to the literatures on inter-American relations, race and foreign affairs, and U.S.-Caribbean and U.S.-Third World relations. This chapter lays out the question: how did all interested parties—the U.S. and British governments, African Americans, and West Indian nationalists—navigate the route to decolonization? Much of the answer lay in the “protean partnership” that emerged from the Anglo-American relationship, transnational racial dynamics, the Cold War, and the construction of a West Indies Federation. Argues that this history offers a chance to plumb the relationship between the Cold War and decolonization. Describes the book's finding that in the West Indies, the Cold War had an important but not decisive impact on decolonization, first slowing and then accelerating a process already underway.

Keywords:   U.S. foreign relations, British West Indies, West Indies Federation, decolonization, Caribbean, Cold War, African Diaspora, African Americans, Third World, Inter-American relations

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