Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Jews and SamaritansThe Origins and History of Their Early Relations$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Gary N. Knoppers

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780195329544

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195329544.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 November 2017

The Fall of the Northern Kingdom as a New Beginning in Northern Israelite–Southern Israelite Relations

The Fall of the Northern Kingdom as a New Beginning in Northern Israelite–Southern Israelite Relations

Chapter:
(p.71) 4The Fall of the Northern Kingdom as a New Beginning in Northern Israelite–Southern Israelite Relations
Source:
Jews and Samaritans
Author(s):

Gary N. Knoppers

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195329544.003.0004

Chapter 4 explores the implications of neglected texts in Chronicles, postulating a continuous northern Israelite presence in the land, despite a series of Assyrian invasions. The authors of Chronicles selectively employ a version of Samuel-Kings but rewrite, rearrange, and supplement this older work. According to this alternate account, members of the northern tribes were familiar with ancestral traditions shared with the southern tribes, retained their tribal structures, enjoyed recourse to Yahwistic prophecy, worshiped the same deity as the Judahites, maintained contacts with their southern kin, and on one major occasion showed profound mercy to their defeated Judahite kin. Both groups were familiar with and held accountable to the Torah. Given that the text of Chronicles, like Kings, was written in Judah, this shows both that the Judean community was hardly monolithic in character and that some in Judah who viewed the Yahwistic residents of Samaria as fellow Israelites and coreligionists.

Keywords:   book of Chronicles, continuous Israelite presence, Samuel-Kings, good Samaritans, Yahwism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .