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Imaging the Aging Brain$
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William Jagust and Mark D'Esposito

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195328875

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195328875.001.0001

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Dopaminergic Modulation of Cognition in Human Aging

Dopaminergic Modulation of Cognition in Human Aging

Chapter:
(p.71) 5 Dopaminergic Modulation of Cognition in Human Aging
Source:
Imaging the Aging Brain
Author(s):

Shu-Chen Li

Ulman Lindenberger

Lars Nyberg

Hauke R. Heekeren

Lars Bäckman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195328875.003.0005

This chapter reviews evidence from recent studies applying a wide range of imaging methods and computational approaches to investigate age-related neurochemical changes that affect neuronal signal transduction. Specifically, we focus on age-related impairments in the dopamine (DA) systems and their relations to cognitive deficits in late life. Other neurotransmitter systems—most notably acetylcholine, norepinephrine, serotonin, and glutamate—also undergo alterations during the adult life course. Thus far, however, the DA systems have attracted most attention and there is mounting evidence that DA is a key neurotransmitter in the context of cognitive aging. Molecular imaging methods for assessing age-related decline in pre- and post-synaptic markers of the dopaminergic systems as well as more recent genomic imaging, multimodal imaging, and computational neuroscience approaches to investigate how dopaminergic modulation affects cognitive aging are particularly highlighted.

Keywords:   cognition, aging, dopamine, genes, receptor imaging, genomic imaging, multimodal imaging, serotonin, norepinephrine

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