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Toward Positive Youth DevelopmentTransforming Schools and Community Programs$
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Marybeth Shinn and Hirokazu Yoshikawa

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195327892

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195327892.001.0001

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Schools that Actualize High Expectations for All Youth: Theory for Setting Change and Setting Creation

Schools that Actualize High Expectations for All Youth: Theory for Setting Change and Setting Creation

Chapter:
(p.81) Chapter 5 Schools that Actualize High Expectations for All Youth: Theory for Setting Change and Setting Creation
Source:
Toward Positive Youth Development
Author(s):

Rhona S. Weinstein

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195327892.003.0005

Despite a large literature about educational expectancy effects as well as current U.S. policy focused on raising expectations in schooling, intervention research has been relatively rare. Drawing upon an ecological perspective, this chapter describes a setting-level theory about the promotion of high expectations for diverse populations of students. Four exemplars of expectancy interventions (de-tracking a high school, turning around a low-performing elementary school, creating a high-expectation elementary school, and developing an early-college secondary school for the first in the family to attend university) illustrate the levers of change. Expectancy change rests upon the capacity to see youth in a more favorable light, as capable of learning despite difference, and upon increased individual and organizational capacity to challenge and support the talent development of a diversity of students.

Keywords:   educational expectancy effects, self-fulfilling prophecies, setting change, changing schools, promoting high expectations

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