Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Toward Positive Youth DevelopmentTransforming Schools and Community Programs$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Marybeth Shinn and Hirokazu Yoshikawa

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195327892

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195327892.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 25 April 2018

The Ethnic System of Supplementary Education: Nonprofit and For-Profit Institutions in Los Angeles’ Chinese Immigrant Community

The Ethnic System of Supplementary Education: Nonprofit and For-Profit Institutions in Los Angeles’ Chinese Immigrant Community

Chapter:
(p.229) Chapter 13 The Ethnic System of Supplementary Education: Nonprofit and For-Profit Institutions in Los Angeles’ Chinese Immigrant Community
Source:
Toward Positive Youth Development
Author(s):

Min Zhou

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195327892.003.0013

Informal social settings outside of school are as important as formal educational settings for children's learning and achievement. In the United States, informal settings are often organized by ethnicity and socioeconomic status in order to mediate the processes of individual learning, which consequently leads to intergroup differences in educational outcomes. This chapter examines how a particular type of informal social setting is created and structured by the ethnic community in order to generate resources for school success. By looking specifically into the non-profit and for-profit institutions serving young children and youth in Los Angeles' Chinese immigrant community, the chapter describes an ethnic system of supplementary education that not only offers tangible support but also reinforces cultural norms in pushing immigrant children to succeed in school. It is shown that the kind of informal social setting to which Chinese immigrant children are exposed is not necessarily intrinsic to a specific culture, but results from a national-origin group's migration selectivity, the strength of a pre-existing ethnic community, and the host society's reception. National-origin groups that constitute a significant middle class with valuable resources (i.e. education, job skills, and financial assets), upon arrival in the United States, have a leg-up in the race to move ahead in their new homeland, while others lacking group resources trail behind. Educators and policymakers should be careful not to attribute school success or failure merely to culture or to structure, but to the culture—structure interaction.

Keywords:   Chinatown, Chinese Schools, afterschool tutoring, supplementary education, ethnic entrepreneurship, immigration

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .