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Trials of ReasonPlato and the Crafting of Philosophy$

David Wolfsdorf

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195327328

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195327328.001.0001

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(p.240) APPENDIX 1 COMMONLY USED GREEK WORDS

(p.240) APPENDIX 1 COMMONLY USED GREEK WORDS

Source:
Trials of Reason
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

(p.240) APPENDIX 1

COMMONLY USED GREEK WORDS

TRIALS OF REASON APPENDIX 1

Note that since the Greek language is highly inflected, forms of adjectives and nouns may appear in the main text with slightly different endings. For example, agathon indicates neuter gender, whereas agathos is masculine.

agathon

(ἀγαθόν)

good

(noun, to agathon)

agôn

(ἀγών)

trial, contest

(plural, agônes)

aischron

(αἰσχρόν)

base, shameful, ugly, foul

aitia

(αἰτία)

cause, reason

(plural, aitiai)

aition

(αἴτιον)

cause, reason

akrasia

(ἀκρασία)

weakness (of will)

andreia

(ἀνδρεία)

courage

(adjective, andreion)

aporia

(ἀπορία)

perplexity, no‐passage

(plural, aporiai)

archê

(ἀρχή)

beginning, principle, rule

(plural, archai)

aretê

(ἀρετή)

excellence, virtue

(adjective, ariston)

boulêsis

(βούλησις)

desire

(plural, boulêseis)

dêmos

(δη̑μος)

populus

dikaiosunê

(δικαιοσύνη)

justice

(adjective, dikaion)

dunamis

(δύναμις)

power, capacity

(plural, dunameis)

eidôlon

(εἴδωλον)

image, phantom

eidos

(εἰ̑δος)

order, organized form,  Form

(plural, eidê)

eirôneia

(εἰρωνεία)

dissembling, “irony”

(adjective, eirôn)

empeiria

(ἑμπειρία)

competence, knack

(plural, empeiriai)

epistêmê

(ἐπιστήμη)

knowledge

(plural, epistêmai)

epithumia

(ἐπιθυμία)

desire

(plural, epithumiai)

ergon

(ἔργον)

work, product, function

(plural, erga)

eudaimonia

(εὐδαιμονία)

well‐being, happiness

(adjective, eudaimon)

hêdonê

(ἡδονή)

pleasure

(plural, hêdonai)

hosiotês

(ὁσιότης)

holiness, piety

(adjective, hosion)

homoiotês

(ὁμοιότης)

likeness

(adjective, homoion)

hupothesis

(ὑπόθεσις)

postulate, foundation

(plural, hupotheseis)

kakon

(κακόν)

bad

kalon

(καλόν)

beautiful, fine, admirable

(noun, kallos, to kalon)

nomos

(νόμος)

convention, custom, law

oikeiotês

(οἰκειότης)

belonging

(adjective, oikeion)

ousia

(οὐσία)

being, essence, property

paideia

(παιδεία)

education

pathos

(πάθος)

affection

philia

(ϕιλία)

friendship

(adjective, philon)

philhêdonia

(ϕιληδονία)

love of pleasure

(adjective, philhêdonos)

philonikia

(ϕιλονικία)

love of winning, ambition

(adjective, philonikos)

philosophia

(ϕιλοσοϕία)

philosophy, love of wisdom

(adjective, philosophon)

philotimia

(ϕιλοτιμία)

love of esteem

(adjective, philotimon)

phronêsis

(ϕρόνησις)

wisdom, intelligence

(adjective, phronimon)

phusis

(ϕύσις)

nature

poiêma

(ποίημα)

action

psychê

(ψυχή)

soul

sophia

(σοϕία)

wisdom, knowledge

(adjective, sophon)

sôphrosunê

(σωϕροσύνη)

sound‐mindedness

(adjective, sôphron)

technê

(τέχνη)

craft, expertise, knowledge

(plural, technai)

timê

(τιμή)

esteem, honor, repute

(p.241)

Notes:

The argument in this appendix will strike many as extreme. Whether or not the argument succeeds, my hope is that the discussion will be found valuable insofar as it attempts to draw the problems of this topic into sharper focus.