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Zen Skin, Zen MarrowWill the Real Zen Buddhism Please Stand Up?$

Steven Heine

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195326772

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195326772.001.0001

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(p.201) Bibliography

(p.201) Bibliography

Source:
Zen Skin, Zen Marrow
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

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