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Primate Neuroethology$
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Michael Platt and Asif Ghazanfar

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195326598

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195326598.001.0001

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The Comparative Neuropsychology of Tool Use in Primates with Specific Reference to Chimpanzees and Capuchin Monkeys

The Comparative Neuropsychology of Tool Use in Primates with Specific Reference to Chimpanzees and Capuchin Monkeys

Chapter:
(p.587) Chapter 29 The Comparative Neuropsychology of Tool Use in Primates with Specific Reference to Chimpanzees and Capuchin Monkeys
Source:
Primate Neuroethology
Author(s):

William D. Hopkins

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195326598.003.0029

This chapter reviews behavioral and neurobiological data on tool use in primates. It shows that great apes, in particular chimpanzees, excel at tool use—especially generalizing principles to new tool-using tasks and contexts. However, there is limited evidence that monkeys, even highly manual species such as capuchins, do so as readily. It is argued that this behavior is strongly associated with neuroanatomical changes that include the expansion of the cerebellum and interhemispheric connectivity.

Keywords:   tool use, primates, chimpanzees, great apes, capucin monkeys

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