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Remembering the HolocaustA Debate$
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Jeffrey C. Alexander

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195326222

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195326222.001.0001

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On the Global and Local Representations of the Holocaust Tragedy

On the Global and Local Representations of the Holocaust Tragedy

Chapter:
(p.173) On the Global and Local Representations of the Holocaust Tragedy
Source:
Remembering the Holocaust
Author(s):

Jeffrey C. Alexander

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195326222.003.0008

This chapter begins by presenting a comic strip,Non Sequitor, by Wiley. This strip of popular culture indicates that the universalization of the Holocaust is alive and well, even as the collective consciousness continually addresses fears of forgetting. Then, it provides a historical context for “The Social Construction of Moral Universals”. It examines how the movement, from a progressive tragic trauma narration created moral particularism alongside universalism, and fueled social splitting and antagonism at the same time as cooperation and expanded solidarity. This chapter also looks at Israeli Jews.

Keywords:   comic strip, Non Sequitor, Holocaust, universalization, Israeli Jews, moral particularism

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