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God's IrishmenTheological Debates in Cromwellian Ireland$
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Crawford Gribben

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195325317

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195325317.001.0001

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 The Ecclesiastical Role of Women

 The Ecclesiastical Role of Women

Chapter:
(p.151) 6 The Ecclesiastical Role of Women
Source:
God's Irishmen
Author(s):

Crawford Gribben (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195325317.003.0007

This chapter documents Irish Cromwellian debates about the ecclesiastical role of women. Preachers and theologians disagreed as to the extent to which their women members could take part in public worship. Some insisted on their total silence, while others were prepared to allow women to speak in subject to the church. Other women rejected the denominations for the alternative of prophetic individualism. This debate is documented through its impact on Elizabeth Avery, whose apparent conservative drift from the notorious heresy of the Seekers to the orthodox Puritanism of the Independents was indicative of larger trends in the period.

Keywords:   women, silence, prophetic individualism, Elizabeth Avery, heresy, conservative drift

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