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The World Heroin MarketCan Supply Be Cut?$
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Letizia Paoli, Victoria A. Greenfield, and Peter Reuter

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195322996

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195322996.001.0001

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Synthesis of Findings and Lessons for Policy Making

Synthesis of Findings and Lessons for Policy Making

Chapter:
(p.235) 11 Synthesis of Findings and Lessons for Policy Making
Source:
The World Heroin Market
Author(s):

Letizia Paoli

Victoria A. Greenfield

Peter Reuter

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195322996.003.0011

This chapter sums up the key findings of this study on the possibility of reducing opiate and heroin production. The result reveals that drug control policy, especially governments' enforcement of prohibitions on production and trade, and properties of addiction can help explain important differences in the reduction of opiate and heroin production, largely through their divergent effects on production, trafficking, and consumption. This chapter identifies the determinants of opiate and heroin production, trafficking, and consumption. It contends that the main rationale for long-term policy should be to minimize the adverse consequences associated with opiate production, trafficking, and consumption in terms of human health, welfare, violence, corruption, and conflict.

Keywords:   opiate production, heroin production, drug control policy, addiction, long-term policy, human health, welfare, violence, corruption, conflict

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