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Bee Pollination in Agricultural Ecosystems$
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Rosalind James and Theresa L. Pitts-Singer

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195316957

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195316957.001.0001

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Invasive Exotic Plant-Bee Interactions

Invasive Exotic Plant-Bee Interactions

Chapter:
(p.166) 10 Invasive Exotic Plant-Bee Interactions
Source:
Bee Pollination in Agricultural Ecosystems
Author(s):

Karen Goodell

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195316957.003.0010

This chapter examines the interactions between exotic invasive plants focusing on the following questions: How do bees contribute to invasive plant establishment and spread? How do resident bee communities respond to the invasion? What are the indirect effects of the invasion mediated by pollinator communities? New data on the frequency of insect pollinator-dependent invasive plant species in US natural areas confirm that pollinator interactions are likely to play a role in the outcome of many invasions. Generalizations are sought regarding which invasive plant–bee interactions likely contribute most to reproduction of invasive plants and negative indirect effects on native plant communities. Finally, mechanisms behind pollinator-mediated indirect effects of invasive plants on native plants are examined by considering invasive plants as resources that contribute to bee population abundance and community structure.

Keywords:   pollinator conservation, invasive plant control, pollinator specialization, pollen limitation, plant reproduction, mutualisms, improper pollen transfer

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