Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Cognitive Neuroscience, Development, and PsychopathologyTypical and Atypical Developmental Trajectories of Attention$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jacob A. Burack, James T. Enns, and Nathan A. Fox

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780195315455

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195315455.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 December 2017

ATTENTION AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ANXIETY DISORDERS

ATTENTION AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ANXIETY DISORDERS

THE IMPORTANCE OF DISENTANGLING REACTIVE VERSUS REGULATORY COMPONENTS OF ATTENTION

Chapter:
(p.71) ﹛ 4 ﹜ ATTENTION AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ANXIETY DISORDERS
Source:
Cognitive Neuroscience, Development, and Psychopathology
Author(s):

Patricia L. Jordan

J. Bruce Morton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195315455.003.0004

Individual differences in child temperament longitudinally predict the development of anxiety disorders. The mechanisms that mediate this longitudinal relation, however, remain poorly understood. One possibility is that heightened behavioral inhibition promotes the development of threat-related attentional biases associated with anxiety. Although there is significant empirical evidence linking threat-related attentional biases with anxiety, there is little understanding of the relative contribution of reactive versus regulatory components of attention in conferring vulnerability. The chapter proposes a two-factor model that distinguishes between reactive biases in attentional orienting and effortful attentional regulation. Specifically, it is hypothesized that individuals with biases in both attentional orienting (i.e., toward threat-related information) and poor attentional regulation should be most vulnerable to the development of anxiety. The chapter concludes by outlining several empirical strategies for disentangling the relative contribution of reactive and regulatory components of attention in conferring vulnerability for anxiety.

Keywords:   attention, anxiety, temperament, orienting, regulation

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .