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Familicidal HeartsThe Emotional Styles of 211 Killers$
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Neil Websdale

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195315417

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195315417.001.0001

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Civil Reputable Hearts

Civil Reputable Hearts

Chapter:
(p.176) 5 CIVIL REPUTABLE HEARTS
Source:
Familicidal Hearts
Author(s):

Neil Websdale

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195315417.003.005

Chapter 5 explores the emotional styles of 14 civil reputable familicidal hearts (7 male, 7 female). These perpetrators appear conformist, proper, respectable, almost emotionally constipated or tightly constrained. Unlike livid coercive hearts, they tend to maintain their intimate relationships, find common ground with spouses and partners, and make various accommodations, including playing their specific part in a gendered division of labor. As the author points out, when honorable and respectable men and women commit familicide, their acts raise the disturbing possibility that other like-situated persons have similar potential. The author explores the way civil reputable hearts appeared to fit into the social order, examines their latent discontent including their oftentimes suppressed rage and emotional suffering, and, finally discusses their planning and preparation to kill.

Keywords:   conformity, civil reputable hearts, gender roles, emotional repression, familicide, domestic violence

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