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Millennial Dreams and Apocalyptic NightmaresThe Cold War Origins of Political Evangelicalism$
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Angela M. Lahr

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195314489

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314489.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.199) Conclusion
Source:
Millennial Dreams and Apocalyptic Nightmares
Author(s):

Angela M. Lahr (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314489.003.0008

The end of the Cold War did not diminish the influence of evangelicalism on American society. Evangelicals continued to draw on eschatological interpretations to shape their worldviews. The number of prophecy Web sites exploded in the late twentieth century, and born‐again Christians proved a profitable market for the popular Left Behind series. Speculation about evangelical influence on political institutions and local, state, and national elections persist into the 21st century. Yet the diverse evangelical frameworks that emerged after the Vietnam War make it clear that evangelicalism is not monolithic. Whatever the framework, though, American evangelicalism today was in part empowered by its demarginalization in the Cold War.

Keywords:   evangelicalism, eschatological, Left Behind, political, prophecy, Web site

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