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Poor Women in Rich CountriesThe Feminization of Poverty Over the Life Course$
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Gertrude Schaffner Goldberg

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195314304

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314304.001.0001

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Women’s Poverty in Canada: Cross-Currents in an Ebbing Tide

Women’s Poverty in Canada: Cross-Currents in an Ebbing Tide

Chapter:
(p.151) 6 WOMEN’S POVERTY IN CANADA: CROSS-CURRENTS IN AN EBBING TIDE
Source:
Poor Women in Rich Countries
Author(s):

Patricia Evans

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314304.003.0006

This chapter begins with a discussion of the key factors that influence the changing profile of Canadian inequality and marginalization. These include the growth in precarious employment; the discourse and direction of government spending, including the income-based policies that are particularly important to lone mothers and elderly women; and the level of commitment shown to gender equity. The next two sections explore, in turn, the economic well-being of lone mothers and elderly women, the factors that underlie Canada's declining poverty rates, and the current challenges posed by precarious employment. The chapter concludes by assessing the degree to which poverty in Canada is feminized.

Keywords:   Canada, poverty, poor women, Canadian women, inequality, single mothers, elderly women

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