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Why Some Things Should Not Be for SaleThe Moral Limits of Markets$
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Debra Satz

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195311594

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195311594.001.0001

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Child Labor: A Normative Perspective

Child Labor: A Normative Perspective

Chapter:
(p.155) 7 Child Labor: A Normative Perspective
Source:
Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale
Author(s):

Debra Satz (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195311594.003.0007

This chapter explores the normative issues posed by child labor. The first section briefly considers the conceptual problems of defining who is a child for the purposes of identifying child labor. The second section explores several considerations that make child labor morally problematic, considerations that turn on all four of the parameters presented in chapter 4: weak agency, vulnerability, and extreme harm to the individual child and to society. Guided by these considerations, the author defends a position distinct from both those who argue that all child labor should be abolished immediately and those who argue that we must accommodate it.

Keywords:   child labor, basic interests, harm, autonomy, multiple equilibria, universalism, human rights, trade offs

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