Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Why Some Things Should Not Be for SaleThe Moral Limits of Markets$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Debra Satz

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195311594

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195311594.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 November 2017

The Market’s Place and Scope in Contemporary Egalitarian Political Theory

The Market’s Place and Scope in Contemporary Egalitarian Political Theory

Chapter:
(p.63) 3 The Market’s Place and Scope in Contemporary Egalitarian Political Theory
Source:
Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale
Author(s):

Debra Satz (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195311594.003.0003

This chapter examines two prominent but divergent contemporary views about the relationship between markets and equality. On the first view, while markets have an important role to play in society, egalitarians should seek to rectify the distributional inequalities that markets create by using a tax and transfer system. On the second view, egalitarianism requires equality in certain specific goods. The strengths and weaknesses of each view are shown and lay the groundwork for the author’s own theory of how markets relate to equality.

Keywords:   general egalitarianism, specific egalitarianism, Michael Walzer, Ronald Dworkin, James Tobin, tax and transfer, citizenship

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .