Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Textbook of Cancer Epidemiology$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Hans-Olov Adami, David Hunter, and Dimitrios Trichopoulos

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195311174

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195311174.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 October 2017

Endometrial Cancer

Endometrial Cancer

Chapter:
(p.468) 18 Endometrial Cancer
Source:
Textbook of Cancer Epidemiology
Author(s):

Immaculata Devivo

Ingemar Persson

Hans-Olov Adami

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195311174.003.0018

Endometrial cancer occurs mostly after the menopause and has an excellent prognosis. The age-standardized incidence varies at least ten-fold across countries, suggesting the strong influence of modifiable risk factors. Risk reduction is conferred by current smoking, past oral contraceptive use, childbearing, lower weight and, tentatively, physical activity. The most compelling evidence that hormones determine the risk of endometrial cancer comes from studies of hormone therapy following menopause. Use of estrogens alone for ten years or more increases the risk about ten-fold. This excess risk may be counteracted substantially by combined use of estrogens and progestins. Hence, it should be possible to prevent a substantial fraction of all endometrial cancers through modification of lifestyle, maintaining normal weight, optimal use of oral contraceptives and postmenopausal hormones.

Keywords:   menopause, tobacco, oral contraceptive, weight, physical activity, hormone therapy

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .