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The Development of Persistent Criminality$
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Joanne Savage

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195310313

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195310313.001.0001

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Perinatal and Developmental Determinants of Early Onset of Offending: A Biosocial Approach for Explaining the Two Peaks of Early Antisocial Behavior

Perinatal and Developmental Determinants of Early Onset of Offending: A Biosocial Approach for Explaining the Two Peaks of Early Antisocial Behavior

Chapter:
(p.179) CHAPTER 9 Perinatal and Developmental Determinants of Early Onset of Offending: A Biosocial Approach for Explaining the Two Peaks of Early Antisocial Behavior
Source:
The Development of Persistent Criminality
Author(s):

Stephen G. Tibbetts

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195310313.003.0009

This chapter discusses the current state of scientific knowledge on the importance of early onset in the etiology of persistent offending. After reviewing the evidence showing the importance of early onset in predicting persistent, serious offending, a discussion of issues involving the definition, measurement, and prevalence of early onset is provided. The majority of the chapter examines the predictors of early onset, with an emphasis on interactions between biological and environmental factors. The general conclusion of the review is that a multitude of physiological and environmental factors have consistently been linked with early onset, and that the highest risk for early onset occurs when such physiological perinatal problems occur in conjunction with environmental or social predictors throughout early development. Strategies for intervention and policy implications are also discussed.

Keywords:   early onset, crime, early onset offending, neurobiology, biology, personality, prenatal factors, perinatal complications, interactions, parenting

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