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Stress, Trauma, and Children's Memory DevelopmentNeurobiological, cognitive, clinical and legal perspectives$
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Mark L. Howe, Gail S. Goodman, and Dante Cicchetti

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195308457

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195308457.001.0001

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Maltreatment, Event-Related Potentials, and Memory

Maltreatment, Event-Related Potentials, and Memory

Chapter:
(p.83) 3 Maltreatment, Event-Related Potentials, and Memory
Source:
Stress, Trauma, and Children's Memory Development
Author(s):

Dante Cicchetti

W. John Curtis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195308457.003.0004

Research utilizing event-related potentials (ERPs) has greatly advanced knowledge concerning the neural underpinnings of a variety of cognitive processes in both children and adults. This methodology has also allowed for an examination of changes in the neural processes associated with cognitive development from early infancy through to young adulthood. This chapter begins with a brief technical and historical overview of ERP methodology, and this is followed by a survey of the major findings of ERP studies examining normative memory functioning in infants and children. The review of ERP and memory in normal populations sets the stage for a more comprehensive understanding of the patterns of findings in ERP research with children who have experienced maltreatment. Finally, the chapter suggests future research directions on ERPs and memory in samples of maltreated and nonmaltreated infants and children, and discusses how such investigations could inform the design and implementation of randomized prevention and intervention trials with children who have experienced maltreatment.

Keywords:   ERP, memory, children, infants, child abuse, neural processes, cognitive development, ERP methodology

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