Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Democracy and the New Religious Pluralism$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Thomas Banchoff

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195307221

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195307221.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 October 2017

 Immigration and the New Religious Pluralism

 Immigration and the New Religious Pluralism

A European Union/United States Comparison

Chapter:
(p.59) 4 Immigration and the New Religious Pluralism
Source:
Democracy and the New Religious Pluralism
Author(s):

José Casanova

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195307221.003.0005

This chapter shows that one of the most significant consequences of the new global patterns of transnational migration has been a dramatic growth in religious diversity in the United States and Western Europe. The new immigrant religions, however, present significantly different challenges of integration in Christian/Secular Europe and in Judeo-Christian/Secular America due to the different histories of immigration and modes of immigrant incorporation, the different patterns of religious pluralism, and the different types of secularism in both regions. Religion in the United States constitutes a positive resource insofar as religious associations and religious collective identities constitute one of the accepted avenues for immigrant incorporation and for mutual group recognition in the public sphere of American civil society. In Europe, by contrast, secularist world views and various institutional patterns of public recognition through different forms of church-state relations make the incorporation of immigrant religions in the public sphere of European civil societies a more contentious issue.

Keywords:   immigrant religiosity, securalization, United States, Western Europe, Islam, integration, church-state relations

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .